Shop More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
February 26, 2012
Image Size
413 KB
Resolution
900×600
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
25,358
Favourites
2,137 (who?)
Comments
129
Downloads
314
×
Lucy by hellcorpceo Lucy by hellcorpceo
I was reading Dracula a while back, and decided to do a painting of Lucy. Lucy gets a bad rap in the movies--Movie Dracula is seductive, and so Lucy is a slutty slutty slut because she falls for him first and gets vampirized. In the book, Lucy is a wonderful woman, and her only real flaw is having idiot friends who are too stupid to actually protect her.

Seriously, the thing reads like Van Helsing and his cohorts have some kind of memory disorder. They keep leaving the near-dead Lucy alone, and either Dracula breaks in, or the house staff freaking LETS HIM IN by opening the windows in Lucy's room and taking down all the garlic because it smells bad. This happens again and again and again. Surely, you think, surely THIS TIME Van Helsing will stop being a baby and just spend the night in the room while Lucy's suitors search for Dracula and kill him. But no, nobody does that, and so Lucy has to die. Worst vampire hunters ever.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconsmartguy776:
smartguy776 Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2014
I think the reason that Lucy's made into a slut in film adaptations is (at least in part) because that's how Stoker wanted the character to be viewed.  I'll explain.  The Victorian Era had very rigid and strict sexual morals.  Talking about sex openly was considered taboo and homosexuality was looked down on, but the moral system was especially strict for women.  Women were required to constantly keep a look and appearance of being pure, both before and after they were married.  This code of purity required women to restrict their sexual activities to their husband among other strict requirements.  Failure to maintain this image, whether it was by engaging in pre-marital or extra-marital sex (whether or not she was willing), prostitution or some other activity considered sexually immoral, led to the woman being considered impure and ostracized by society as punishment for failing to maintain her purity.  In Stoker's novel, one of the probably more memorable lines from Lucy is "why can't they let a  woman marry three men, or as many as want her, and save all this trouble."  To many people in the Victorian Era, this would have indicated that Lucy desires, in some form or another, to possess more than one lover, essentially stepping out of reserving sex for her husband.  Lucy's transformation into a vampire is also, metaphorically, a departure from this Victorian image.  Dr. Seward describes the vampirized Lucy with the words "the purity had turned to voluptuous wantonness."  This indicates that Lucy has become the antithesis of the Victorian Ideal of womanhood.
She is shortly afterwards staked and killed by the band of men who've witnessed what she has become.  The staking can be seen as a metaphorical punishment for departing from the standards of Victorian morality.  The Victorians didn't view Lucy as a tragic victim of an evil creature, but as a sexually immoral woman who got what was coming to her.

As to why this has to do anything with Lucy being made into a slut in the films?  Well, we live in a society whose sexual morals are far less strict than the Victorians, (I'd even go so far as to say hyper-sexualized) so people tend to view the Lucy from Stoker's novel in a more sympathetic light.  So, when filmmakers adapt the book, in order to keep her being viewed by the audience (who are presumed never to have read the book) as the sexually immoral woman who gets the punishment she deserves, they slutify her.  However, I do believe its possible they can go overboard with it. (Like the version of Lucy played by Sadie Frost in Coppola's 1992 film)
Reply
:iconsmartguy776:
smartguy776 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2014
Your Welcome! You can find the book on Xlibris.com.  For a quick shortcut, go to the artpiece titled "if your there, knock once" by LilithRow.  You'll find a link in the comments that will take you directly to the spot on Xlibris.com where you can purchase it.
Reply
:iconlittle-bow-peep:
little-bow-peep Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2014   General Artist
Cool! Thanks! 
Reply
:iconsmartguy776:
smartguy776 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2014
Independent? That is honestly the last word that I would ever use to describe Mina (At least the version of her from Stoker's novel) It's true that Mina is a progressive character with her studying new machines and being intelligent, but she does all her work in the service of helping her husband and the band of hunters.  A smart character and definitely one of the strongest, if not the strongest, characters in the novel, but an independent one, no.
Reply
:iconsmartguy776:
smartguy776 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2014
Well, if Dracula is one of your favorite Novels, then I would like to recommend the Un-Dead Joel H. Emerson.  Its a retelling of Dracula with the characters and events that Stoker had to delete from the original novel reinserted into it.  Some of the new characters in the novel are Francis Aytown (An artist who falls under Dracula's influence) and Cotford (a police inspector sent in to investigate the death of Arthur's father Edward) and some new events include Jonathan having adventures in Munich and Quincy Morris going on an adventure to Transylvania.  There are some changes taken from other sources (such as Renfield being made into a solicitor, which is taken from the 1931 Universal film, and there's a new subplot concerning the Holmwoods that pretty much is Emerson's invention) but I highly recommend the book to any fan of Stoker's original novel. (Which I have to say I am honestly not)
Reply
:iconlapislove1990:
lapislove1990 Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2014
very true, i thought lucy was great, a free spirit, but the movie makes her a trampy strumpet(hooker). thats not fair.
Reply
:iconsmartguy776:
smartguy776 Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014
Uhh...what about dracula? And doesn't Mina notice in one chapter that there's a cloud of mist moving toward her but then not tell the party about it?  Her thinking has to be something along the lines of "My husband and his friends are off searching for a supernatural creature capable of changing shape, and there is a cloud that seems to be sentient moving towards me.  I'm sure there is nothing for me to worry about or tell them."

but yes, her brain does seem to be the most properly functioning of the party in that book. 
Reply
:iconashimbabbar:
ashimbabbar Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014
today there's only 2 of us… tomorrow the world ! XD
Reply
:iconsmartguy776:
smartguy776 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014
I agree with you.
Reply
:iconashimbabbar:
ashimbabbar Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014
silly me Waaaah!  

otherwise I still think I have a point… 
Reply
Add a Comment: